Antique Map Africa

1719 Henri Chatelain Rare Antique Map, Peoples, Animals & Views of South Africa

1719 Henri Chatelain Rare Antique Map, Peoples, Animals & Views of South Africa
1719 Henri Chatelain Rare Antique Map, Peoples, Animals & Views of South Africa
1719 Henri Chatelain Rare Antique Map, Peoples, Animals & Views of South Africa

1719 Henri Chatelain Rare Antique Map, Peoples, Animals & Views of South Africa
Coutumes Moeurs & Habillemens Des Peuples Qui Habitent Aux Environs du Cap de Bonne Esperance..... Chatelain, Henri Abraham 1684 - 1743. 20in x 17 1/2in (510mm x 440mm). This large original copper-plate engraved antique map with views of The Cape of Good Hope, Southern Africa - with 10 vignettes of the peoples, animals & reptiles of the area - was published by Henri Abraham Chatelain in 1719, in his famous Atlas Historique. These are truly some of the best early engravings of this region done at the time that were copied by the likes of Prevost, Harrison & others in the 18th century, but not with the same eye for detail.

Paper thickness and quality: - Heavy and stable Paper color : - off white Age of map color: - Colors used: - General color appearance: - Paper size: - 20in x 17 1/2in (510mm x 440mm) Plate size: - 17 1/2in x 15in (440mm x 380mm) Margins: - Min 1in (25mm). Margins: - None Plate area: - None Verso: - None. Background: By the early 17th century, Portugals maritime power was starting to decline, and English and Dutch merchants competed to oust Lisbon from its lucrative monopoly on the spice trade.

Representatives of the British East India Company did call sporadically at the Cape in search of provisions as early as 1601, but later came to favour Ascension Island and St. Helena as alternative ports of refuge. Dutch interest was aroused after 1647, when two employees of the Dutch East India Company (VOC) were shipwrecked there for several months. The sailors were able to survive by obtaining fresh water and meat from the natives. They also sowed vegetables in the fertile soil.

Upon their return to Holland, they reported favourably on the Capes potential as a warehouse and garden for provisions to stock passing ships for long voyages. In 1652, a century and a half after the discovery of the Cape sea route, Jan van Riebeeck established a victualling station at the Cape of Good Hope, at what would become Cape Town, on behalf of the Dutch East India Company. In time, the Cape became home to a large population of vrijlieden, also known as vrijburgers lit. Free citizens, former Company employees who stayed in Dutch territories overseas after serving their contracts. Dutch traders also imported thousands of slaves to the fledgling colony from Indonesia, Madagascar, and parts of eastern Africa.

Some of the earliest mixed race communities in the country were formed through unions between vrijburgers, their slaves, and various indigenous peoples. This led to the development of a new ethnic group, the Cape Coloureds, most of whom adopted the Dutch language and Christian faith. The eastward expansion of Dutch colonists ushered in a series of wars with the southwesterly migrating Xhosa tribe, known as the Xhosa Wars, as both sides competed for the pastureland necessary to graze their cattle near the Great Fish River. Vrijburgers who became independent farmers on the frontier were known as Boers, with some adopting semi-nomadic lifestyles being denoted as trekboers.

The Boers formed loose militias, which they termed commandos, and forged alliances with Khoisan groups to repel Xhosa raids. Both sides launched bloody but inconclusive offensives, and sporadic violence, often accompanied by livestock theft, remained common for several decades. Great Britain occupied Cape Town between 1795 and 1803 to prevent it from falling under the control of the French First Republic, which had invaded the Low Countries. Despite briefly returning to Dutch rule under the Batavian Republic in 1803, the Cape was occupied again by the British in 1806.

Following the end of the Napoleonic Wars, it was formally ceded to Great Britain and became an integral part of the British Empire. British emigration to South Africa began around 1818, subsequently culminating in the arrival of the 1820 Settlers. The new colonists were induced to settle for a variety of reasons, namely to increase the size of the European workforce and to bolster frontier regions against Xhosa incursions. In the first two decades of the 19th century, the Zulu people grew in power and expanded their territory under their leader, Shaka.

Shakas warfare indirectly led to the Mfecane (crushing), in which 1,000,000 to 2,000,000 people were killed and the inland plateau was devastated and depopulated in the early 1820s. An offshoot of the Zulu, the Matabele people created a larger empire that included large parts of the highveld under their king Mzilikazi. During the early 1800s, many Dutch settlers departed from the Cape Colony, where they had been subjected to British control. They migrated to the future Natal, Orange Free State, and Transvaal regions.

The Boers founded the Boer Republics: the South African Republic (now Gauteng, Limpopo, Mpumalanga and North West provinces), the Natalia Republic (KwaZulu-Natal), and the Orange Free State (Free State). The discovery of diamonds in 1867 and gold in 1884 in the interior started the Mineral Revolution and increased economic growth and immigration. This intensified British efforts to gain control over the indigenous peoples. The struggle to control these important economic resources was a factor in relations between Europeans and the indigenous population and also between the Boers and the British. The Anglo-Zulu War was fought in 1879 between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom.

Following Lord Carnarvons successful introduction of federation in Canada, it was thought that similar political effort, coupled with military campaigns, might succeed with the African kingdoms, tribal areas and Boer republics in South Africa. In 1874, Sir Henry Bartle Frere was sent to South Africa as High Commissioner for the British Empire to bring such plans into being. Among the obstacles were the presence of the independent states of the Boers and the Kingdom of Zululand and its army. The Zulu nation defeated the British at the Battle of Isandlwana. Eventually, though, the war was lost, resulting in the termination of the Zulu nations independence.

The Boer Republics successfully resisted British encroachments during the First Boer War (18801881) using guerrilla warfare tactics, which were well suited to local conditions. Chatelain, Henri Abraham 1684 - 1743 Chatelain was a Huguenot pastor of Parisian origins.

He lived consecutively in Paris, St. Chatelain was a skilled artist and knew combining a wealth of historical and geographical information with delicate engraving and an uncomplicated composition. Groundbreaking for its time, this work included studies of geography, history, ethnology, heraldry, and cosmography.

His maps with his elegant engraving are a superb example from the golden age of French mapmaking. Henri Abraham Chatelain, his father Zacharie Chatelain d.

The atlas was published in seven volumes between 1705 and 1720, with a second edition appearing in 1732. The volumes I-IV with a Third edition and volume I with a final edition in 1739. Henri Abraham Chatelain, whose \\"Atlas Historique\\" was one of the most expansive Dutch encyclopedias of the age. First published in 1705, Chatelain\\'s Atlas Historique was part of an immense seven-volume encyclopedia. Although the main focus of the text was geography, the work also included a wealth of historical, political, and genealogical information. The text was compiled by Nicholas Gueudeville and Garillon with a supplement by H. De Limiers and the maps were engraved by Chatelain, primarily after charts by De L\\'Isle. The atlas was published in Amsterdam between 1705 and 1721 and was later reissued by Zacharie Chatelain between 1732 and 1739. Atlas Historique: First published in Amsterdam from 1705 to 1720, the various volumes were updated at various times up to 1739 when the fourth edition of vol. I appeared, stated as the \\dernière edition, corrigée & augmentée. \\ The first four volumes seem to have undergone four printings with the later printings being the most desirable as they contain the maximum number of corrections and additions. An ambitious and beautifully-presented work, the Atlas Historique was intended for the general public, fascinated in the early eighteenth century by the recently conquered colonies and the new discoveries. Distant countries, such as the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, Mongolia, China, Japan, Indonesia, etc. Take an important place in this work. In addition to the maps, many of which are based on Guillaume De L\\'Isle, the plates are after the best travel accounts of the period, such as those of Dapper, Chardin, de Bruyn, Le Hay and other.

Other sections deal with the history of the european countries, and covers a wide range of subjects including genealogy, history, cosmography, topography, heraldry and chronology, costume of the world, all illustrated with numerous engraved maps, plates of local inhabitants and heraldic charts of the lineages of the ruling families of the time. The maps, prints and tables required to make up a complete set are listed in detail in each volume.

The accompanying text is in French and often is printed in two columns on the page with maps and other illustrations interspersed. Each map and table is numbered consecutively within its volume and all maps bear the privileges of the States of Holland and West-Friesland. The encyclopaedic nature of the work as a whole is reflected in this six frontispiece.

The pages are the work of the celerated mr. And are engraved by J. New scholarship has suggested the compiler of the atlas, who is identified on the title as \\Mr. C\\ not to be Henri Abraham Châtelain, but Zacharie Châtelain. See Van Waning\\'s article in the Journal of the International Map Collectors\\' Society for persuasive evidence of the latter\\'s authorship. (Ref: M&B; Tooley) Please note all items auctioned are genuine, we do not sell reproductions.

A Certificate of Authenticity (COA) can be issued on request. What is an Antique Map. The word Antique in the traditional sense refers to an item that is more than a hundred years old.

The majority of antique maps for sale today come from books or atlases and have survived due to the protection offered by the hardback covers. The first thing to determine when staring a collection or purchasing an item, is what is important to you. Most collectors prefer to build their collections around a theme. You may decide to collect maps from one region or country, charting its development through time. Similarly you could collect maps of one particular period in time, by type i.

Sea or celestial charts or by cartographer. The collector might also want to consider the theme of cartographical misconceptions such as California as an island or Australia as Terra Australis or the Great Southern Land. The subject is so wide that any would-be-collector has almost endless possibilities to find his own little niche within the field, and thereby build a rewarding collection.

Starting a collection & pricing. Pricing is based on a number of different factors, the most important of which is regional.

In any series of maps the most valuable are usually the World Map and the America/North America. The World because it is usually the most decorative and America because it has the strongest regional market. Other factors that come into play re: price is rarity, age, size, historical importance, decorative value (colour) and overall condition and quality of paper it is printed on. As specialised dealers, we frequently work with first time map buyers who are just starting their collection. Classical Images was founded 1998 and has built an excellent reputation for supplying high quality original antiquarian maps, historical atlases, antique books and prints.

We carry an extensive inventory of antiquarian collectibles from the 15th to 19th century. Our collection typically includes rare books and decorative antique maps and prints by renowned cartographers, authors and engravers. Specific items not listed may be sourced on request. Classical Images adheres to the Codes of Ethics outlined by the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America (ABAA).

We are a primarily an online based enterprise, however our inventory may be viewed by appointment. Attention Sellers - Get Templates Image Hosting, Scheduling at Auctiva. The item "1719 Henri Chatelain Rare Antique Map, Peoples, Animals & Views of South Africa" is in sale since Saturday, March 14, 2020. This item is in the category "Antiques\Maps, Atlases & Globes\Africa Maps". The seller is "searching01" and is located in Ivanhoe, VIC.

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1719 Henri Chatelain Rare Antique Map, Peoples, Animals & Views of South Africa