Antique Map Africa

1831 S. D. U. K. Map of Ancient Egypt

1831 S. D. U. K. Map of Ancient Egypt

1831 S. D. U. K. Map of Ancient Egypt

This product data sheet is originally written in English. WE SELL ONLY ORIGINAL ANTIQUE MAPS - NOT REPRODUCTIONS. Description: This is a fascinating and beautiful 1831 example of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge or S.

Centered on the Nile River Delta, the map covers Egypt and the Sinai Peninsula and part of Arabia and the Red Sea. Several ancient towns and oases along the Nile are noted.

The map also contains numerous interesting cartographic annotations. Several notes are included throughout regarding the absence of ancient places and names mentioned on the map.

Possibly this map's most interesting aspect is its speculative presentation of the ancient Lake Moeris, now just a small lake called Birket Qarun, and the legendary'Labyrinthus site unknown'' near modern day Hawara. The lost Labyrinth was described by many classical authors including Herodotus, Strabo, Diodorus and Pliny.

A sprawling megalithic complex designed by Imandes for the Pharaoh Amenemhet III, the Labyrinth is believed to have contained thousands of rooms filled with hieroglyphs and ancient Egyptian sculptures. Herodotus wrote about it in the fifth century B.

Furthermore, they resolved to leave a memorial of themselves in common, and in pursuance of this resolve they made a labyrinth, a little above Lake Moeris, and situated near what is called the City of the Crocodiles. Yet the temple at Ephesus and that in Samos are surely remarkable. The pyramids, too, were greater than words can tell, and each of them is the equivalent of many of the great works of the Greeks; but the labyrinth surpasses the pyramids also. It has 12 roofed courts, with doors facing one another, 6 to the north and 6 to the south and in a continuous line. There are double sets of chambers in it, some underground and some above, and their number is 3,000; there are 1,500 of each. We ourselves saw the aboveground chambers, for we went through them so we can talk of them, but the underground chambers we can speak of only from hearsay. For the officials of the Egyptians entirely refused to show us these, saying that there were, in them, the coffins of the kings who had built the labyrinth at the beginning and also those of the holy crocodiles. So we speak from hearsay of these underground places; but what we saw aboveground was certainly greater than all human works. The passages through the rooms and the winding goings-in and out through the courts, in their extreme complication, caused us countless marvelings as we went through, from the court into the rooms, and from the rooms into the pillared corridors, and then from these corridors into other rooms again, and from the rooms into other courts afterwards.

The roof of the whole is stone, as the walls are, and the walls are full of engraved figures, and each court is set round with pillars of white stone, very exactly fitted. At the corner where the labyrinth ends there is, nearby, a pyramid 240 feet high and engraved with great animals. The road to this is made underground. Such was the labyrinth; but an even greater marvel is what is called Lake Moeris, beside which the labyrinth was built. The circuit of this lake is a distance of about 420 miles, which is equal to the whole seaboard of Egypt.

The length of the lake is north and south, and its depth at the deepest is 50 fathoms [300 feet]. That it is handmade and dug, it itself is the best evidence. For in about the middle of the lake stand 2 pyramids that top the water, each one by 50 fathoms [300 feet], and each built as much again underwater; and on top of each there is a huge stone figure of a man sitting on a throne.

So these pyramids are 100 fathoms [600 feet] high, and these 100 fathoms are the equivalent of a 600-foot furlong, the fathom measuring 6 feet, or four cubits (the cubit being six spans). The water in the lake is not fed with natural springs, for the country here is terribly waterless, but it enters the lake from the Nile by a channel; and for 6 months it flows into the lake, and then, another 6, it flows again into the Nile. During the 6 months that it flows out, it brings into the royal treasury each day a silver talent for the fish from it; and when the water flows in, it brings 20 minas a day. Several archeological surveys have been undertaken to unearth the labyrinth, but so far no findings have been confirmed.

This map was originally published by Baldwin and Cradock and copyrighted in 1831, but was issued in Volume two of Chapman and Hall's 1844 edition of Maps of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge. It was engraved by John Walker of J. Size: Printed area measures 15.5 inches high by 13 inches wide. Bears University of California Library Stamp, from which it was deaccessioned, in lower right quadrant.

If your address is a P. Duty varies by country and we cannot predict the amount you will be charged. Some countries are duty free, others are not. Other Services Conservation Framing: Geographicus recommends basic conservation framing services for any antique paper. We do not offer this service.

Antique Map Restoration: Geographicus can repair and restore your antique map. Services include deacidification cleaning flattening and backing. It has 12 roofed courts, with doors facing one another, 6 to the north and 6 to. Map of Ancient Egypt" is in sale since Tuesday, October 8, 2019. This item is in the category "Antiques\Maps, Atlases & Globes\Africa Maps".

The seller is "geographicusmaps" and is located in Brooklyn, New York. This item can be shipped worldwide.


1831 S. D. U. K. Map of Ancient Egypt