Antique Map Africa

1947 map Anglo Egyptian Sudan Juba R. Nile Amadi Mongalla British Military map

1947 map Anglo Egyptian Sudan Juba R. Nile Amadi Mongalla British Military map
1947 map Anglo Egyptian Sudan Juba R. Nile Amadi Mongalla British Military map
1947 map Anglo Egyptian Sudan Juba R. Nile Amadi Mongalla British Military map
1947 map Anglo Egyptian Sudan Juba R. Nile Amadi Mongalla British Military map
1947 map Anglo Egyptian Sudan Juba R. Nile Amadi Mongalla British Military map
1947 map Anglo Egyptian Sudan Juba R. Nile Amadi Mongalla British Military map
1947 map Anglo Egyptian Sudan Juba R. Nile Amadi Mongalla British Military map
1947 map Anglo Egyptian Sudan Juba R. Nile Amadi Mongalla British Military map
1947 map Anglo Egyptian Sudan Juba R. Nile Amadi Mongalla British Military map
1947 map Anglo Egyptian Sudan Juba R. Nile Amadi Mongalla British Military map
1947 map Anglo Egyptian Sudan Juba R. Nile Amadi Mongalla British Military map
1947 map Anglo Egyptian Sudan Juba R. Nile Amadi Mongalla British Military map

1947 map Anglo Egyptian Sudan Juba R. Nile Amadi Mongalla British Military map

1947 map Anglo Egyptian Sudan Juba R. Nile Amadi Mongalla British Military map.

Juba /dub/[1] is the capital and largest city of South Sudan. The city is situated on the White Nile and also serves as the capital of Central Equatoria State. It is the world's newest capital city, and had a population of 525,953 in 2017. It has an area of 52 km2 (20 sq mi), with the metropolitan area covering 336 km2 (130 sq mi).

Juba was established in 192021 by the Church Missionary Society (CMS) in a small Bari village, also called Juba. The city was made as the capital of Mongalla Province in the late 1920s. The growth of the town accelerated following the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement in 2005, [2] which made Juba the capital of the Autonomous Government of Southern Sudan. Juba became the capital of South Sudan in 2011, but influential parties wanted Ramciel to be the capital. The government announced the move of the capital to Ramciel, but is yet to occur.

The Anglo-Egyptian Sudan (Arabic: as-Sdn al-Inglz al-Mar) was a condominium of the United Kingdom and Egypt in the the Sudans region of northern Africa between 1899 and 1956, corresponding mostly to the territory of present day Sudan and South Sudan. Legally, sovereignty and administration were shared between both Egypt and the United Kingdom, but in practice the structure of the condominium ensured effective British control over Sudan, with Egypt having limited, local power influence in reality[clarification needed]. Following the Egyptian Revolution of 1952, Egypt pushed for an end to the condominium, and the independence of Sudan.

By agreement between Egypt and the United Kingdom in 1953, Sudan was granted independence as the Republic of the Sudan on 1 January 1956. In 2011, the south of Sudan itself became independent as the Republic of South Sudan. In the 19th century, whilst nominally a vassal state of the Ottoman Empire, Egypt had acted as a virtually independent state since Muhammad Ali's seizure of power in 1805.

Seeking to supplant and ultimately replace the Ottoman Empire as the dominant regional power, Muhammad Ali declared himself Khedive, and expanded Egypt's borders both southwards into Sudan, and eastwards into the Levant and Arabia, the latter at the expense of the Ottoman Empire. Territory in Sudan was annexed by Egypt, and governed as an integral part of the country, with Sudanese granted Egyptian citizenship.

Ultimately, the intervention of the Great Powers in support of the Ottoman Empire forced Egypt to return all Levantine and Arabian territory to the Ottomans upon Muhammad Ali's death, however, there was no such impediment to Egypt's southward expansion. During the reign of Muhammad Ali's grandson, Isma'il Pasha, Egypt consolidated and expanded its control of the Sudan as far south as the Great Lakes region, whilst simultaneously acquiring territory in modern day Chad, Eritrea, Djibouti, and Somalia. Additionally, the hitherto unsanctioned use of the title Khedive was formally approved by the Ottoman Sultan. Egypt was at the height of its power, with Isma'il seeking the establishment of a contiguous African empire that could be a bulwark against European expansion in Africa. Isma'il's grand ambitions were, however, cut short by Egypt's ruinous defeat in the Ethiopian-Egyptian War, which exacerbated pre-existing financial problems in the country caused by his cripplingly expensive programmes of rapid modernisation.

This led ultimately to the Great Powers deposing Isma'il in 1879 in favour of his son, Tewfik Pasha. Egypt thereafter withdrew from all territories outside of Sudan, and Egypt proper.

Discontent with the rule of Tewfik sparked two revolts in 1881, the Mahdist Revolt in Sudan, and the Orabi Revolt in Egypt proper. Whilst the military intervention of the United Kingdom in 1882 crushed the Orabi Revolt, and restored Tewfik's nominal authority in Egypt proper, the Mahdist Revolt continued to expand, leaving Sudan under the effective rule of the Mahdist rebels.

The British military presence in Egypt transformed the country into a virtual protectorate of the United Kingdom. Though it remained de jure a self-governing vassal state of the Ottoman Empire, true power now rested with the United Kingdom's representative in Cairo. In the following decade, the United Kingdom reformed and remodelled the Egyptian military on British lines, and British and Egyptian forces gradually defeated the Mahdist rebels, and restored the nominal authority of the Egyptian Khedive in Sudan.

However, as in Egypt proper, this authority was compromised by the reality of effective British control. In 1899, the United Kingdom forced Abbas II, Tewfik's successor as Khedive, to transform Sudan from an integral part of Egypt into a condominium in which sovereignty would be shared between Egypt and the United Kingdom. Once established, the condominium witnessed ever-decreasing Egyptian control, and would for most of its existence be governed in practice by the United Kingdom through the Governor-General in Khartoum. For the remainder of his reign, this would be one of the flashpoints between the nationalist Khedive Abbas II and the United Kingdom, with Abbas seeking to arrest and reverse the process of increasing British control in Egypt and Sudan. Following the Ottoman Empire's entry in to the First World War as a member of the Central Powers in 1914, the United Kingdom deposed the anti-British Abbas II in favour of his pro-British uncle, Hussein Kamal.

The legal fiction of Ottoman sovereignty was terminated, and the Sultanate of Egypt, destroyed by the Ottoman Empire in 1517, was re-established with Hussein Kamal as Sultan. Despite the restoration of the nominal sultanate, British power in Egypt and Sudan was undiminished, as the United Kingdom declared Egypt to be a formal protectorate of the United Kingdom.

Whilst Egypt was not annexed to the British Empire, with the British King never becoming sovereign of Egypt, Egypt's status as a protectorate precluded any actual independence for the sultanate. For all intents and purposes, the Sultanate of Egypt was as much controlled by the United Kingdom as the Khedivate of Egypt had been. Rising nationalist anger at British control led to the Egyptian Revolution of 1919, prompting the United Kingdom to recognise Egyptian independence in 1922 as the Kingdom of Egypt. Egyptian nationalists, and Sudanese favouring union with Egypt, demanded that Sudan be included within the bounds of the kingdom, with the term "Kingdom of Egypt and Sudan" entering the nationalist vernacular.

However, in the terms of the legal instrument by which the United Kingdom recognised Egyptian independence, it specifically reserved the issue of the governance of Sudan as a question to be resolved in the future. Defying Egyptian and Sudanese demands, the United Kingdom gradually assumed more control of the condominium, edging out Egypt almost completely by 1924.

In the decades that followed, Egyptian and Sudanese discontent and anger at continued British rule in Sudan increased. On 16 October 1951, the Egyptian government abrogated the agreements underpinning the condominium, and declared that Egypt and Sudan were legally united as the Kingdom of Egypt and Sudan, with King Farouk as the King of Egypt and the Sudan. This was superseded by the Egyptian Revolution of 1952 eight months later, which overthrew King Farouk.

The new revolutionary government under Muhammad Naguib and Gamal Abdel Nasser made Sudanese independence a priority. Naguib himself was half-Sudanese, and had been born and raised in Khartoum. Under continued pressure, the United Kingdom conceded to Egypt's demands in 1953, with the governments of both Egypt and the United Kingdom agreeing to terminate the condominium, and grant Sudan independence in 1956. On 1 January 1956, Egyptian and British sovereignty over Sudan duly ended, and Sudan became independent.

The item "1947 map Anglo Egyptian Sudan Juba R. Nile Amadi Mongalla British Military map" is in sale since Saturday, June 19, 2021. This item is in the category "Antiques\Maps, Atlases & Globes\Africa Maps".

The seller is "t82681" and is located in Cheltenham. This item can be shipped worldwide.

  • Cartographer/Publisher: GSGS
  • Printing Technique: Lithography
  • Original/Reproduction: Vintage Original
  • Format: Sheet Map
  • Type: Topographical Map
  • Year: 1947
  • Date Range: 1945
  • City: Juba
  • Country/Region: Africa
  • Era: 1940s


1947 map Anglo Egyptian Sudan Juba R. Nile Amadi Mongalla British Military map